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The Modifying the Impact of ICU-Associated Neurological Dysfunction-USA (MIND-USA) Study

The long-term objective of the MIND-USA (Modifying the Impact of ICU-Induced Neurological Dysfunction-USA) Study is to define the role of antipsychotics in the management of delirium in vulnerable critically ill patients. We and others have shown that delirium is an independent predictor of more death, longer stay, higher cost, and long-term cognitive impairment often commensurate with moderate dementia. The rapidly expanding aging ICU population is especially vulnerable to develop delirium, with 7 of 10 medical and surgical ICU patients developing this organ dysfunction. Antipsychotics are the first-line pharmacological agents recommended to treat delirium, and over the past 30 years they gained widespread use in hospitalized patients globally prior to adequate testing of efficacy and safety for this indication. Haloperidol, the most commonly chosen antipsychotic, is used by over 80% of ICU doctors for delirium, while atypical antipsychotics are prescribed by 40%. Antipsychotics safety concerns include lethal cardiac arrhythmias, extrapyramidal symptoms, and the highly publicized increased mortality associated with their use in non-ICU geriatric populations. The overarching hypothesis is that administration of typical and atypical antipsychoticsâ¿¿haloperidol and ziprasidone, in this caseâ¿¿to critically ill patients with delirium will improve short- and long-term clinical outcomes, including days alive without acute brain dysfunction (referred to as delirium/coma-free days or DCFDs) over a 14-day period; 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year survival; ICU length of stay; incidence, severity, and/or duration of long-term neuropsychological dysfunction; and quality of life at 90-day and 1-year. To test these hypotheses, the MIND-USA Study will be a multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled investigation in 876 critically ill, delirious medical/surgical ICU patients who are (a) on mechanical ventilation or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation or (b) in shock on vasopressors. In each group (haloperidol, ziprasidone, and placebo), 292 patients will be enrolled and treated until delirium has resolved for 48 hours or to 14 days (whichever occurs first) and followed for 1 year.

Sponsored by: Vanderbilt University